Archive for February, 2011

Replacing Dyson DC07 Cyclone Bin Flap Catch Clip

How to install the Dyson DC07 Cyclone Bin Flap Catch: You need to replace the bin flap catch (clip) on your DC07 when the flap no longer closes and stays closed. If you open the flap and look for the little black spring-loaded titling clip, it has a hook on the bottom of it that breaks occasionally. This is […]

Dyson DC01 Review

Today, the DC01 is discontinued, but the model still appears on after-market Dyson websites as a reconditioned buy. The basic model is grey and yellow, while occasionally the limited edition grey and blue Antarctica models will be found. Some feature higher rated filter systems such as the “Absolute Plus” and the famous multicoloured “De Stijl” model celebrating the neoplasticism movement.

The question is, after so many years, is a refurbished Dyson DC01 better than the current line up of cheaper cyclonic uprights, or against newer Dyson models? They may be a bargain if priced between £60 and £80. As ever, I would avoid the allegedly reconditioned examples to be found on eBay for circa £20–£30. You get what you pay for. Buy from a Dyson specialist if you are buying one; not from a fly-by-night faceless internet-only vendor.

The DC01 Design

There is a lot to be said of the DC01. It serves its purpose well if all you need is an upright vacuum cleaner that can handle removing dirt from carpets. On laminate floors, the DC01 will never be terribly efficient due to the always-spinning roller brush that cannot be switched off with a brush control knob as on later models.

A series of three tools were originally with the DC01, a long crevice tool, a round upholstery brush and a flat stair tool useful for cleaning the stairs, the car, mattresses and curtains. An adaptor is supplied for using the tools with the back telescopic hose.

The tools on the DC01 are stored at the bottom, two on each side, but in common usage they can fall out and this storage idea remains a bad design idea. Dyson improved this on later models.

Performance

Noise is something that if you are the owner of a DC01 you have to get used to. Then again, the DC01 always had a 1200 watt motor, which when compared with today’s cheapest bagless upright, is very humble, but watts do not directly equate to airwatts and suction. Vacs that can maintain suction are different, and vacs these days that cannot suck up 100% of the time, will need a higher wattage motor to fill the void of losing power by maintaining the power.

Over carpets, the DC01 is comparable to similar specification uprights that use bags, it is quite adequate in performance still.

Filtration

Most Dyson DC01’s have a multi-stage filtration system that is predominantly S-Class or HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filter to provide cleaner air than air and dust sucked into the machine (Dyson call it S-level). Changing the filters on a DC01 is easy, there is an article right here on Dyson medic about this: Changing Dyson DC01 Filters.

The amount of dirt that was trapped by the filters on my DC01, after the first three months of ownership, was incredible. The basic rule of thumb is, if the filters are black, replace them! Filter replacements are available from >>here<< for just £5 for a pack of eight.

How To Change Dyson DC01 Filters

Your Dyson DC01, regardless of variant, is fitted with two filters. One is located in a cage slotted into the body of the machine and the other is located under a flap below the cyclone unit.

It is important to pay regular attention to your filters as they allow your Dyson to breathe. Depending on usage, they should be checked every three to six months. You should pay particular attention to your filters if you have had building work carried out. Your Dyson does not like plaster dust.

Most Dyson DC01’s were originally fitted with disposable fibre filters (a few very late machines had washable filters). They are quite inexpensive to buy. You can pick up a pack of eight standard filters (enough for 4 filter changes) for less than £5 here: Dyson DC01 filters

It only takes literally moments to change your filters. It is not necessary to take it to a vacuum cleaner repair shop. Anyone can do this at home with no expertise and no tools.

Click the title “How To Change Dyson DC01 Filters” above to go to the full article with how-to photos.

Dyson DC14 Wont Stand Upright

“My Dyson DC14 wont stand up” is the thing many people ask about on Dyson support forums. If your Dyson DC14 has this symptom, it likely isn’t picking up too well either. It may well be dropping some of the debris on the floor as well.

It was OK yesterday wasn’t it? What happened? You were using it, then it wouldn’t stand up.

Its actually quite a simple thing to fix that anyone can do at home. You don’t need any tools, you don’t need any expertise.

Our friends at Nelson Vacuums in Australia have made a short video on the subject that tells you everything you need to know. You will laugh at how much of a simple fix this is. Click the triangle “play” emblem on the video below (Note the video below is of a DC07, but this aspect of these machines is the same as your DC14 and the fix is identical).

Dyson DC04 Wont Stand Upright

“My Dyson DC04 wont stand up” is the thing many people ask about on Dyson support forums. If your Dyson DC04 has this symptom, it likely isn’t picking up too well either. It may well be dropping some of the debris on the floor as well.

It was OK yesterday wasn’t it? What happened? You were using it, then it wouldn’t stand up.

Its actually quite a simple thing to fix that anyone can do at home. You don’t need any tools, you don’t need any expertise.

Our friends at Nelson Vacuums in Australia have made a short video on the subject that tells you everything you need to know. You will laugh at how much of a simple fix this is. Click the triangle “play” emblem on the video below (Note the video below is of a DC07, but this aspect is identical to your DC04 and the fix is identical).

Dyson DC07 Motor Replacement Guide

Dyson DC07 Motor Swap/Change

Remember to make sure your Dyson DC07 is unplugged from the mains before starting this job.

Replacing the motor is probably the most technical, and certainly the hardest repair to the Dyson DC07, and should only be undertaken by competent people who feel confident enough with electrical appliances to do it. This is not an amateur job and if you are not confident performing a motor swap to your Dyson DC07, please take it to a vacuum cleaner repair shop.

Before you start, here is what you will need:

*A new motor. You can get a top quality one for £35 including fast UK delivery here: >>Dyson DC07 Motor<< *Various flat blade screwdrivers (you probably have a selection of those anyway). *A Dyson Star T15 Torx screwdriver (buy a good quality one >>HERE<<). *Pliers (or maybe grips). *A big cup of tea, the wife out of the house, and an hour or two to kill. Likely Symptoms of a Failed Dyson DC07 Motor: *A noticeable smell of burning or a very strong acrid smell when the Dyson is running. *The motor may sound noisy, laboured or be varying in speed when running. *The motor may make a strange popping or bubbling type of noise. *Smoke or sparks from motor housing area. *There can be a high pitched noise from the motor, which may suggest that the motor bearings are worn out. DC07 Model Variations. This video below was made using a base model DC07 without the brush control knob (clutch). There are some differences to the sole plate and brush-roll areas on machines fitted with a clutch (All Floors models). However, the core elements of the machine are almost the same. The replacement of the Dyson DC07 motors are somewhat similar between all variants, and shouldn't create too much of a challenge to those with a technical inclination. Click the title link to the main article to watch the video.

Washing or Changing the Filter on a Dyson DC07

Is your Dyson DC07 cutting out? Let it cool down and it will run again maybe. Sound familiar?

Is suction not as good as it was? It’s all generally working but suction has declined over time?

Did you ever change the filter?

“There’s a filter?” you ask. “Where is it?”

Not only is there a filter, but it is a washable filter. You can wash it a few times before it will need replacing (unless you have neglected it beyond the point of no return, in that event, you buy a new Dyson DC07 filter). So here is what you do: Take a look down the side of the machine, see that little coloured button?

Dyson DC17 Free User Operating Instruction Manual

Looking for an original Dyson instruction and operating manual for your Dyson DC01? You have come to the right place.
When you buy a used or a reconditioned Dyson, unless you have acquired it from a meticulous old lady who had it from new, you are unlikely to have got the original user manual.
Many people are confused with Dysons when it comes to using the back hose, using the tools, taking the wand off, emptying the vacuum cleaner, and simple maintenance of the filters. However, these things are not very hard if you know how. To know how, you need an original manufacturers user manual.
Dyson UK will happily sell you one for two or three pounds, but you are an internet surfer; you want one free don’t you? C’mon, admit it! You know it’s true.
OK, we’ll put you out of your misery. Click the link below to go through to the Dyson Forums where there are links to download all the Dyson user/operating/instruction manuals in PDF format. Completely free of charge.
Here is the link: Free Dyson Instruction Operating User Manuals

Dyson DC03 Switch Removal and Cable Replacement

Removing the switch unit from a Dyson DC03 in order that you can access the power switch and the mains lead (flex): Now the Dyson DC03’s are getting a little elderly, the cable occasionally breaks inside the sheathing near to where it enters the machine. This can cause intermittent operation as the break in the wire opens and closes as the machine is moved around and the cable flexes. Occasionally, the power switch itself may fail necessitating replacement.

The coloured button itself must be removed first. The power button on a Dyson DC03 depresses at the front to power the machine on and off, and pivots at the back. In order to be able to remove it without breaking it, you must first understand exactly how and where it pivots. The picture below is of a DC03 switch unit out of the machine but reassembled so you can see the pivot point.

The arrow in the photo is indicating the pivot point.

In order to remove the button, you need to place a slim blade down the side of the switch button, at each side, to dislocate the pegs from the holders. The hard part is knowing exactly where to place your blade at each side, which is why I showed you a switch unit removed, but re-assembled with the button in place. You need to be careful doing this bit as the plastic may crack while you are manipulating it.

The Brush Roll Won’t Turn – Dyson DC04, Dyson DC07 and Dyson DC14

So your brush roll (sometimes called a brush bar or a beater bar) wont turn or spin round on your Dyson DC04, Dyson DC07 or Dyson DC14?

I am going to cover the DC04, DC07 and DC14 models altogether here as the following advice is applicable for all three as they have very similar bottom end mechanicals.

First you should establish if your machine is a model with a clutch or without a clutch. If your machine is a model with a clutch, it will typically be designated as an “all floors”, a “multi floor”, an “allergy”, an “animal” or an “absolute”. If your Dyson has a clutch fitted, it will have a knob on the bottom body on the left hand side (looking from the front). It looks like this: (picture on main topic)

The clutch (if fitted), is designed to stop your machine from breaking the belts. If your machine has a clutch, the reason the brush bar isn’t spinning is unlikely to be a snapped belt. The clutch allows your brush roll to be turned off (for certain types of hard floors, etc.). First you should check if your brush bar is turned on. Try to turn the knob one click clockwise to the “auto” position.

If it is in the “auto” position already, now recline the machine by bending the wand handle back whilst holding your foot in the front corner recess of the body when the machine is running (in cleaning position). Did you know that on clutched models, the brush bar is not designed to turn until the machine is reclined into the cleaning position? Many people don’t. Many people think if the brush bar isn’t spinning when the Dyson is upright, that there is something wrong with it. There isn’t! Check to see if the brush bar spins when the machine is reclined in the cleaning position! If after turning the clutch to “auto” the machine brush bar is spinning when the machine is reclined, the problem is solved.

If you have a Dyson without a clutch, the brush roll should spin at all times; no matter if the machine is reclined or stood upright. If your machine doesn’t have a clutch, and the brush bar is not spinning, check the drive belt, it has probably snapped and wants replacing.


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